Threadless Patchworks and Seamy Fabrications 
by Kara Q. Smith

Here, the process and patterning of quiltmaking multifariously inspires. The repetitive tattoo of the sewing machine, the lush and rough textures of fabrics, and the echoing generational symbols of the tradition thread their way through varied works. Each artist concentrates upon, refines, or abstracts individual facets of the rich history of the quilt-as-medium, using it as a launching point for experimental explorations in the present.

At its simplest, the mathematical construction of the quilting star in blocking patterns allows beginners an entry point, and at its most complicated, advanced makers can create their own unique designs. Lena Wolff crafts Radiant Star (2014) out of pieces of hand-painted birch, shaping and seaming the pieces like fabric into that familiar shape. The visible seams of the star’s fabrication draw attention to the hand-cut texture of the birch and each piece’s perfection and whiteness. They simultaneously contrast the multi-colored, soft-fibered nature of quilts with the rough texture of bark. This quilts together an affinity between the advanced viewer of art and the advanced quilter, who both must be able to notice subtle shifts in color and texture in fine craftsmanship of material. 
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Threadless Patchworks and Seamy Fabrications

by Kara Q. Smith

Here, the process and patterning of quiltmaking multifariously inspires. The repetitive tattoo of the sewing machine, the lush and rough textures of fabrics, and the echoing generational symbols of the tradition thread their way through varied works. Each artist concentrates upon, refines, or abstracts individual facets of the rich history of the quilt-as-medium, using it as a launching point for experimental explorations in the present.

At its simplest, the mathematical construction of the quilting star in blocking patterns allows beginners an entry point, and at its most complicated, advanced makers can create their own unique designs. Lena Wolff crafts Radiant Star (2014) out of pieces of hand-painted birch, shaping and seaming the pieces like fabric into that familiar shape. The visible seams of the star’s fabrication draw attention to the hand-cut texture of the birch and each piece’s perfection and whiteness. They simultaneously contrast the multi-colored, soft-fibered nature of quilts with the rough texture of bark. This quilts together an affinity between the advanced viewer of art and the advanced quilter, who both must be able to notice subtle shifts in color and texture in fine craftsmanship of material.

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Public Art in the Metropolis: The Polarizing Power of London’s New Commissions
by Phoebe Stubbs


Public art has to strike a difficult balance in a city like London that is constantly evolving. It carries with it associations of permanence but its presence isn’t always welcome and, perhaps worse than being openly disliked, works in situ over long periods of time can turn into street furniture, invisible to those that pass by day in day out—the ‘public’ for whom the work exists.
Tilted Arc (1981), Richard Serra’s public commission for the Foley Federal Plaza in New York is a great example of how these difficulties can play out. It was a huge rolled steel wall, which, after 1300 local employees signed a petition for its removal and a few high profile complaints about having to walk round it were lodged, ended in a lawsuit that resulted in its removal in 1989. Recently, Tower Hamlets made headlines with its plans to sell off its Henry Moore sculpture, nicknamed Old Flo, to pay for new services. Danny Boyle wrote an open letter to save it and a flash mob of people dressed up as Old Flo herded into the council offices as a protest. Art is public places is clearly polarizing.
Continue Reading … 

Public Art in the Metropolis: The Polarizing Power of London’s New Commissions

by Phoebe Stubbs

Public art has to strike a difficult balance in a city like London that is constantly evolving. It carries with it associations of permanence but its presence isn’t always welcome and, perhaps worse than being openly disliked, works in situ over long periods of time can turn into street furniture, invisible to those that pass by day in day out—the ‘public’ for whom the work exists.

Tilted Arc (1981), Richard Serra’s public commission for the Foley Federal Plaza in New York is a great example of how these difficulties can play out. It was a huge rolled steel wall, which, after 1300 local employees signed a petition for its removal and a few high profile complaints about having to walk round it were lodged, ended in a lawsuit that resulted in its removal in 1989. Recently, Tower Hamlets made headlines with its plans to sell off its Henry Moore sculpture, nicknamed Old Flo, to pay for new services. Danny Boyle wrote an open letter to save it and a flash mob of people dressed up as Old Flo herded into the council offices as a protest. Art is public places is clearly polarizing.

Continue Reading …